The Academy of American Poets is for people who love poetry. Our membership is nearly 9,000 strong and growing, and our programs reach over 20 million people every year. Our programs include Poets.org, the Poets Forum, Poem in Your Pocket Day, National Poetry Month, American Poet magazine, the Poem-A-Day email series, the Poetry Audio Archive, educational initiatives, readings and events, awards and prizes, and so much more. We’ve been doing this since 1934, and we still think it's fun.

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Have questions about submitting work to literary magazines and presses? Then don’t miss our Publishing 101 for Poets panel at this year’s Poets Forum, presented by Kevin Larimer, editor in chief at Poets & Writers Magazine. Info and tickets here: http://bit.ly/1bdRqTj
#POFO13

Have questions about submitting work to literary magazines and presses? Then don’t miss our Publishing 101 for Poets panel at this year’s Poets Forum, presented by Kevin Larimer, editor in chief at Poets & Writers Magazine. Info and tickets here: http://bit.ly/1bdRqTj

#POFO13

Surfers have the odd habit of saying ‘I drowned’ when they mean ‘I almost drowned.’ Drowning, after all, feels like almost drowning until it feels like nothing.
From Alice Gregory’s “Mavericks,” which n+1 just posted online. (Essay was published in #17, which we’ve got and also recommend.) Read it. Love it. (via mcnallyjackson)
Thanks to Brenda Shaughnessy for mentioning the Natalie Diaz poem we published on #PoemADay http://nyti.ms/17csgkb

Thanks to Brenda Shaughnessy for mentioning the Natalie Diaz poem we published on #PoemADay http://nyti.ms/17csgkb

Robert Hass on writers and the gift economy from our inaugural Poets Forum. This year’s panels include topics ranging from The Poetic Impulse, to Ecopoetics, to The Art of Teaching Poetry. More details here: http://bit.ly/1bdRqTj

#POFO13

Claudia Rankine will co-host a panel at this year’s Poets Forum with Marilyn Hacker and Marilyn Nelson on Form: Inspiration and Experimentation. Here’s her talking about great poems in 2009. Tickets for this year’s event available at //bit.ly/1bdRqTj #PoFo13

Poets Forum: the WrestleMania of fall poetry events in NYC. Three days, 30 poets, plus panels, readings, lectures, publishing advice, walkings tours — a smorgasbord of events exploring the ever-changing landscape of contemporary poetry. Step right up, get your tickets!! http://bit.ly/1bdRqTj

Poets Forum: the WrestleMania of fall poetry events in NYC. Three days, 30 poets, plus panels, readings, lectures, publishing advice, walkings tours — a smorgasbord of events exploring the ever-changing landscape of contemporary poetry. Step right up, get your tickets!! http://bit.ly/1bdRqTj

Twas on a lofty vase’s side,
Where China’s gayest art had dyed
The azure flowers that blow;
Demurest of the tabby kind,
The pensive Selima, reclined,
Gazed on the lake below.

Today’s poem: Thomas Gray’s “Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat.” Read more here, or subscribe to our Poem-A-Day series.

With fruit and flowers the board is decked,
The wine and laughter flow;

Today’s poem: Amy Levy’s “At a Dinner Party.”Read more here, or subscribe to our Poem-A-Day series.

theparisreview:

“Professor Ginsberg sits behind his wide desk frowning up at the low ceiling as though the harsh fluorescent light were assaulting him. Without further ado he begins to take roll. Somehow I thought it would be a hey, drop-in-drop-out-whenever-the-mood-suits-you kind of arrangement. As he calls off the names, I realize that half of the people crammed into this tiny room aren’t even enrolled in the class. They’re just here to catch a glimpse of Ginsberg, to get some kind of Beat benediction.”
Read an excerpt from Elissa Schappell’s essay, “A Semester with Allen Ginsberg,” this week’s Longreads Member Pick.

theparisreview:

“Professor Ginsberg sits behind his wide desk frowning up at the low ceiling as though the harsh fluorescent light were assaulting him. Without further ado he begins to take roll. Somehow I thought it would be a hey, drop-in-drop-out-whenever-the-mood-suits-you kind of arrangement. As he calls off the names, I realize that half of the people crammed into this tiny room aren’t even enrolled in the class. They’re just here to catch a glimpse of Ginsberg, to get some kind of Beat benediction.”

Read an excerpt from Elissa Schappell’s essay, “A Semester with Allen Ginsberg,” this week’s Longreads Member Pick.