The Academy of American Poets is for people who love poetry. Our membership is nearly 9,000 strong and growing, and our programs reach over 20 million people every year. Our programs include Poets.org, the Poets Forum, Poem in Your Pocket Day, National Poetry Month, American Poet magazine, the Poem-A-Day email series, the Poetry Audio Archive, educational initiatives, readings and events, awards and prizes, and so much more. We’ve been doing this since 1934, and we still think it's fun.

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ME FAIL WORDS by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha — 
Happy b-day, T.H.K.C..

ME FAIL WORDS by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha —

Happy b-day, T.H.K.C..

And having reached the summit would like to stay there even if the stairs are withdrawn
—Barbara Guest, “The Blue Stairs”
Happy B-day, B.G.!
And having reached the summit
would like to stay there
even if the stairs are withdrawn

Barbara Guest, “The Blue Stairs

Happy B-day, B.G.!


Frida Kahlo (6, Julio de 1907)

Frida Kahlo (6, Julio de 1907)

(Source: andiivi, via utnereader)

Shakespeare's London — including a drawing of the Globe Theatre before its destruction.

Two sketches, loaned by the Yale Center for British Art, are among the most extraordinary items on display in the exhibit.  Drawn by the Czech engraver Wenceslaus Hollar around 1638, these two drawings show London,  as seen by a viewer from Southwark cathedral, on the south side of the Thames, looking to the west and east across the city.   To the east, the bustling urban landscape of  Southwark, and what is now the Tower Bridge; to the west, towards what is now the Tate Modern, the Globe Theatre can be seen in the middle distance, a round building alongside its neighbor, the Swan Theatre.

Shakespeare's London — including a drawing of the Globe Theatre before its destruction.

Two sketches, loaned by the Yale Center for British Art, are among the most extraordinary items on display in the exhibit.  Drawn by the Czech engraver Wenceslaus Hollar around 1638, these two drawings show London,  as seen by a viewer from Southwark cathedral, on the south side of the Thames, looking to the west and east across the city.   To the east, the bustling urban landscape of  Southwark, and what is now the Tower Bridge; to the west, towards what is now the Tate Modern, the Globe Theatre can be seen in the middle distance, a round building alongside its neighbor, the Swan Theatre.

(Source: rememberingshakespeare.library.yale.edu)

Artist book by Liz Mathews featuring poetry by Muriel Rukeyeser

Artist book by Liz Mathews featuring poetry by Muriel Rukeyeser

Various “covers” of Stéphane Mallarmé's ”Un coup de dés jamais n’abolira le hasard,” 1898.